Wednesday, January 02, 2008

Gujarath election: Assertion of entreprenuers

jan 2nd, 2007

the good professor finds an interesting angle.

there was a similar comment from gurumurthy some time ago about castes: those castes like the vanniyars in TN who went into loud grievance-based, more-backward-than-thou politics did badly. those that went into entrepreneurship like the gounders did very well indeed.

in other words, economics beats politics in the long run. unless the politicians resort to assassinations. which they will when the going gets tough.

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Vaidyanathan R

 You may find it different!

 

Gujarat election: Assertion of Entrepreneurs

 

http://www.dnaindia.com/report.asp?newsid=1142702

 

 

R.Vaidyanathan

 

_____________________________________

R.Vaidyanathan

Professor of Finance & Control

Indian Institute of Management

Bannerghatta Road

Bangalore

India

560076

1 comments:

rathore said...

Sri Aurobindo foresaw the disaster that would befall India if it pursued the anti-transparent, anti-entrepreneurial, anti-democratic workings of the Congress.

"An imitation of the forms and workings of the old Congress is also inadvisable. We were never satisfied with those forms and that working. The three days' show [i.e. the Congress sessions], the excessively festal aspect of the occasion, the monstrous preponderance of speech and resolution-passing over action and work, the want of true democratic rule and order, the weary waste of formal oratory without any practical use or object, the incapacity of the assembly for grappling with the real problems of our national existence and progress, the anxiety to avoid public discussion which is the life-breath of democratic politics, these and many other defects made the Congress in our view an instrument ill-made, wasteful of money and energy, and the centre of a false conception of political deliberation and action. If we imitate the Congress, we shall contract all the faults of the Congress." - Sri Aurobindo, October 2, 1909