Wednesday, May 13, 2009

The Rise of Indian Game Developers

There's a new racing game coming out, called "Streets of Mumbai":



The game's developer Trinegames also has other titles in the works, like Legends of Great India:
"Legends of Great India” is a Real Time Strategy Game that captures the epic stories and characters of Ancient India. Players will be able to experience the power of heroes and Gods such as Arjuna, Hanuman, Ganesh, Ram, Shiva and many more. With their help you must save the future of India from all evil, including Ravan and all else who desires evil. The goal for the game is to have the Indian people discover their inner gamer. By creating an interactive world filled with the stories and cultures that the Indian people have grown to love and cherish. The Game is set to be as epic as all the traditional stories, utilizing great godly powers, and commanding hundreds of troops. Legends of Great India has completed pre-production phase and the game production is currently going on.
Some narrow-minded people will no doubt protest these delightful new products from Indian mythology, but I think they'll re-acquaint and re-popularize such mythological tales with the young masses.

5 comments:

Sage said...

At least on this blog can we not reflexively make word "mythology" follow word "Hindu" or "India"? Thanks.

Indian said...

Mythology is used only when they are myths. Here is a good example: http://www.jesusneverexisted.com/

Anjaneya said...

somebody get Rajan Zeid to stop protesting Sonys new Hanuman game.

A said...

While I am all for video games incorporating characters from our great legends, I think the splitting of characters into "good" and "evil" is problematic. Indian mythology is far more complex. Only semitic religions adopt such convenient dichotomized characterization.

san said...

I'm just glad that the prevalence of new media is allowing for a revival of a rich heritage in vivid, colourful ways. Islamists don't like their prophet drawn, rendered, sung about, etc. Hinduism isn't restricted to such narrow-minded constraints.