Friday, October 06, 2006

vinod khosla holds forth: businessweek

oct 7th, 2006

he is a smart guy and has made some awesome bets before. glad he's going after alternative energy, he may make something happen.

by the way, why did OPEC allow oil prices to fall? because it was encouraging people to go after oil substitutes.

http://www.businessweek.com/smallbiz/content/oct2006/sb20061004_513595.htm?campaign_id=nws_insdr_oct6&link_position=link15

14 comments:

KK_IOP said...
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KK_IOP said...
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iamfordemocracy said...
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nizhal yoddha said...

i am not obligated to give visibility to the knee-jerk rantings of some anonymous, third-rate ass; therefore i am deleting kk_iop's idiotic post and also iamdemocracy's response thereto.

Sage said...
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san said...

Don't forget SouthAsia's growing water shortage problem, either. Read about how a new

Machine Generates Water by Extracting it from Air

This is something that India could really use, imho.

slim_shady said...

I find it amazing how India is sharing evidence with Pakistan on the Mumbai events recently, instead of acting on it themselves. Now the culprits get a nice summary of where they slipped up, left a trail, and what they should avoid in the future.

How was I born into such a gutless country?

san said...

Slim, India is bending over backwards to get the N-deal from the US. That's why it's doing these things. The Americans are trying to milk India for all they can. I'm beginning to think India should now just walk away from the deal. We can use the N-proliferation card to then teach the West a lesson.

iamfordemocracy said...

slim_shady has spelt out the peril of joint action (against terrorists). The real problem is that those who envisage it clearly are unable to convince the common man about it. That may either be because the common man does not have time, or because the wise men aren't good enough at convincing those who are not endowed with the time, tools, and the intellect to analyse events.

It is our collective failure and we must focus on ourselves and our own methods to come out with a strategy that will get the common man to vote in a determined fashion.

KapiDhwaja said...

Blackwill on the Indian Economy:
link

KapiDhwaja said...

Swapan Dasgupta from the Pioneer...

That sinking feeling

Swapan Dasgupta

No amount of ham-fisted spin-doctoring and the desperate resurrection of a 35-year-old slogan can take away from what is fast becoming an open secret: The floundering Government of Manmohan Singh. In the early days of the UPA Government, it made sense to contrast the sincerity of the Prime Minister with the blundering ways of his coalition colleagues. Today, there is not even that fig-leaf. By desperately trying to bush aside taunts and show that he is, indeed, leadership material, the Prime Minister has exposed his own inadequacies and ineptitude. Nothing demonstrates this better than his laughable attempts at diplomacy.

The evidence is there in full public gaze. It has taken not even a fortnight for the contrived Havana bonhomie with Pakistan to be overwhelmed by the slippery General's cigar smoke. Even if there are some missing links in the Mumbai Police Commissioner's assertion that the July 11 blasts were the handiwork of the Pakistan-based Lashkar-e-Toiba and local traitors, the implication of his charge that the whole massacre was conducted under the benign supervision of the Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI) is grave. Since the preliminary findings of the Mumbai Police inquiry were available to the Prime Minister and his National Security Adviser when they arrived at the Non-Aligned Movement summit, it follows that the Havana agreement on a joint terror mechanism was signed with a man our Prime Minister knew was the chief patron of terrorism.

Nor is there any basis to de-link the ISI from President Pervez Musharraf. Responding to the growing disquiet in the West over the ISI's complicity in the Taliban's resurgence in the eastern provinces of Afghanistan, Musharraf defended his so-called state-within-a-state aggressively. He told BBC's Newsnight that the ISI was a "disciplined force". When it was pointed out that a leaked British Ministry of Defence (MoD) report advocated that a future civilian Government should send the army to the barracks and disband the ISI, Musharraf retorted angrily that the MoD should disband itself first.

By refusing to perpetuate the fiction that the ISI is somehow an autonomous cabal, Musharraf was, somewhat uncharacteristically, not being economical with the truth. However, by choosing to paint Pakistan as a co-victim of terrorism, the Prime Minister and his Foreign Secretary have compromised India's diplomatic offensive against terrorism. The US Ambassador to Pakistan wasn't being needlessly insolent by suggesting that India should have first given the Mumbai evidence to Pakistan before going public. The logic of the Havana agreement is that the victim and the terrorist must conduct a joint whodunit.

And why blame Pakistan's Foreign Ministry for dismissing the Mumbai investigations as preposterous. If Pakistan is the victim of terrorism, how can it be accused of masterminding terror? By trying, like some others before him, to find a place in history, Manmohan has dug India into a fox hole. The relentless pursuit of a maverick foreign policy has resulted in India being taken less and less seriously in international circles.

Last week, there was the expected ignominy over the Indian candidate to the UN Secretary-General's post -actually he was his own candidate who used India as an expedient launching pad - which exposed the limits of Indian influence. Simultaneously, there was the strange spectacle of the UPA's strategic ally, the CPI(M), deciding that India's priority in the UN strategy is to secure Venezuela's place in the Security Council! Indeed, with India slipping down the value chain, the CPI(M) has decided that it makes more sense to now flaunt its credentials as China's liaison agent in India.

Then there was India's stand-offish attitude towards the ongoing NATO offensive against the Taliban in Afghanistan - an indifference that may have convinced the Washington beltway that India is unlikely to make the jump from potential to performance. If, as a result, the Indo-US nuclear deal is timed out by the Senate, it will signal Manmohan Singh joining Chandra Shekhar, Charan Singh, Deve Gowda and I K Gujral in the pantheon of the insignificant. The dress-rehearsal was his importunate visit to South Africa and the speech to an empty stadium in Durban.

KapiDhwaja said...

More Kangressi-style 'democracy' for you, thanks to the arrogant, Prime Moron of India...
Creeping Dictatorship

iamfordemocracy said...

Kapidhwaja, thanks for the link. That was an informative article. I have two comments. 1. The PMO weilded a similar iron hand when Bajpayee ruled. 2. Inspite of manmohan proving beyond any doubt that he is a no holds barred dictator, the BJP will continue to call him a good man!

Ghost Writer said...

More on the Kangress Culture - this time by Tavleen Singh in the Spindian Express.

On the alternative energy front (the main subject of Rajeev's post) - we need to go in for a process that is

1- USA & China independent i.e. one that does not need the US or China to invest in it

2- Agriculture linked - i.e. one whose outputs, in addition to being clean can be fed into our agricultural sector. This will start a 'Virtuous Cycle' i.e. the more energy is consumed, the more farm output we get. I would not even mind subsidising farm energy if it came from such a resource - the returns in improved farm productivuty will be awesome.

We must never forget that the roots of India's wealth have been and always will be - agriculture and intellectual property.