Wednesday, October 24, 2007

What's behind Asia's moon race?

Success of the Chandrayan mission is essential to raising national pride and mastering a host of technologies from long range "launch vehicles" (an ISRO/DRDO euphemism for missiles), Global positioning systems, Remote sensing,
Missile defense, Defense of space based assets from potential adversaries etc.

Expect the Atlanticists to feel threatened by the Indian endeavour soon.

4 comments:

hokiepride said...

OT,
http://www.economist.com/displaystory.cfm?story_id=9944734
The Atlanticists are bashing their pet China. They great Economist speaketh that China's rural areas are backward and poor just like India's. What happened, could it be related to the pet food scandal and the resulting US ire against China? Looks like interesting times ahead.

san said...

I think these Euro-centrists are just afraid of any competition against their white elephant, the Ariane. They've spent big money on developing it, just like they did with the Airbus. So naturally, they'll have nothing nice to say about anyone else's space program.

Not only am I waiting for our Chandrayaan moon mission, but also I can't wait until we get our new GSLV model working. It's got a much heavier lifting capacity. Furthermore, there's talk of a mission to Mars -- now that would also be very inspiring, so close on the heels of the US.

Haha, once we get a probe to the moon, you can re-drawn the crescent on the Pakistani flag with an Indian orbiter floating above it. ;)

TallIndian said...

an article for january and then one from 1998!

habc said...

This might be the reason they are upset

China beats Germany to take world trade crown

But now Europe is buckling under China's export blitz. The euro has risen 18pc against the yuan over two years. The EU's trade deficit with China may top $220bn this year.

Peter Mandelson, the EU trade commissioner, has warned Beijing that it must curb the tidal wave of goods flooding EU markets, or risk turning a friend into a foe. "It's a question of China... being more conscientious in shouldering their fair share of the demands of this trading relationship," he said.