Saturday, November 25, 2006

Fwd: Trust this invisible advice

nov 25th, 2006

entertaining ghostwriting by jerry rao for milton friedman.

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Shahryar

 
Trust this invisible advice
Jaithirth Rao
Posted online: Saturday, November 25, 2006 at 0000 hrs IST

Dear Dr Singh: As you have doubtless heard from the press, I have entered the Great Beyond and have had the privilege of meeting up with the father of our profession, Adam Smith (if I remember correctly, you earned a prize named for him during your university days). As it happens, one of our first topics of conversation was about your grand country — a country of so much promise and potential, a country unnecessarily cursed with widespread poverty, a country where we all hope you will leave behind a legacy of freedom and prosperity. If you remember, Adam Smith had been an early opponent of the East India Company (a state-sponsored monopoly house) which did so much economic damage to your country and incidentally to Britain, which would have been much better off with India as a prosperous trading partner rather than as an impoverished dependency. Monopolies and quasi-monopolies, be they state-owned or state-sponsored, work arduously to stifle economic competition to the detriment of large numbers of people and for the benefit of a select cozy oligarchy. I don't need to tell you this. Your government has been trying against great odds to dismantle state monopolies. You have had some success in the airlines and telecommunications industries but you are still struggling with coal, electricity distribution and so on. Where you have succeeded, prices have dropped, employment has shot up, consumers have benefited, wealth has been created, citizens are better off. Where you have been held back, the country too seems to have been held back.
 
... deleted

25 comments:

san said...

Here is a link to download the Ramayana by Virgin Comics:

http://www.megaupload.com/?d=VQ3T3BAR

You can look at the images one by one. The artwork is pretty good quality. If you want a special comicbook viewer to make it a little easier, then you can download ComicDisplay here:

http://www.geocities.com/davidayton/CDisplay

abhiha marathe said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
abhiha marathe said...

eg. J Rao's article:

School vouchers + Hindu temple schools = radical improvement in educational standards.

In the US, vouchers are very controversial because fairly good public schools already exist. However, that is not the case in India. So, I like the voucher idea.

bly243001 said...

Jerry Rao is self-confessed proud Macaulayite. So I take his words with handful of salt. Vouchers will only mean that govt. money will end up funding christian/missionary schools, given Indian populace's prejudice against Hindu run schools and penchant for "convent" schools.

Bala said...

Thanks for the link, San... it's really good.. Also came across "Watchmen" uploaded by one 'sanskritter'. If that's you, thanks again!

Ghost Writer said...

Dear Friend Abhiha Marathe
The government does not have to provide vouchers to temple schools - only if they left the schools alone Indian literacy rates would sky-rocket. Read this article http://www.hinduismtoday.com/archives/1986/03/1986-03-05.shtml and the wikipedia entry for the Ramakrishna mission
This lends greater credence to my theory (actually I think Rajeev first propounded it) that the Commies and Secularists have a vested interest in keeping Indian illiterate - and why not if people could read and write they would find out the reality of these sick idiots.

The devil of the piece is Article 30 of the constitution. The greatest service to the Hindu (and Indian) cause would be to amend or abrogate this article. When this is done, in a span of 10-15 odd years the Indian masses will be ready to kick everyone's ass

san said...

Rajeev, there's a new blogging platform called Vox that's just come out, if you're curious. They're supposed to have some newer features for greater ease of use.

abhiha marathe said...

Ghost Writer,

Thanks for your comment. A few schools associated with Hindu organizations that I know of [such as Dhnyan Prabodhini in Pune and a few schools in Mumbai (Vile Parle & Andheri) names of which I cannot recall] are higly regarded. 10-15 years would definitely cause a great transformation.

Right now I am not aware of any politician / party that has changing laws to allow Hindu temples to start schools on its agenda. If you know of any movement in this direction, pl post that info.

AGworld said...

Why did the BJP not take up scrapping of article 30?

anyone with any reliable information on this?

sand_dunes said...

hey rajeev i was watching on CNN-IBN the series "golden south" the final part was the infosys venue and there was ramachandra guha i mean the guy is good but he just is becoming irrelvant these dayz not coz of his blind love for nehru everthing that nehru did from socialism to china to kashmir and that apart from His utter disdain for all other sportspersons other than than cricket guha also says that the south is more progressive more tolerant if not more intelligent coz of pluarity ... but never acknowledges
that ur theory it was kingdoms like Vijaynagar which every south indian acknowledges with pride was acting like a bullwark against the the invaders typical nehruvian !!!

san said...

Islamic shrieking has forced the Pope to back down and in a reversal, now support the entry of Islamic Turkey into the EU.

http://www.nytimes.com/2006/11/29/world/europe/29pope.html

I'm now thinking that maybe this would be a good thing, because the penetration of Turkey into the European bloc will in the long run trigger a Eurabian Civil War. There is no way that the proud Muslims and proud Europeans can occupy the same space and stay civil.

The Brzinskis and Soros' have tried to act as advocates and apologists of the use of jihadis to bleed their Russian blood-enemies. But now their peoples stand to see their jobs swept away under a tide of cheap Turkish labour.

Soon these Atlanticists won't have time to fret over a hypothetical re-conquest of their homeland by Moscow, when instead they'll be busy dealing with the very real onslaught of the Turks. Good for them -- just desserts.

san said...

Here it comes!

Pakistan Openly Urges NATO to Surrender Afghanistan to the Taliban

Was there ever any doubt that these wolves in sheep's clothing would do this? Was there ever question of whose side they're really on?

"Of course we're on the side that opposes terror -- that means the Taliban side, of course"

When Islamists claim to oppose terror and to be supportive of the war on terrorism, they have a totally different picture in their heads than the rest of us. They mean they support the Taliban "freedom fighters" against the Western "terrorists".

They just mean double-speak, any chance they can get.

virat0 said...

sand_dunes, Guha is a guardian of the MaxMuller's idiotic purpose, and he earns quite a lot of fame and money from being that. It is perfect that he is in sardesai's channel. Acknowledging Vijay Nagar would make life much more difficult, considering their life time returns from elsewhere.

I had an e-mail conversation with him, when I pointed how his liberals have burrowed a lot from the perverse colonial analysis. Considering it was his subject of specialization, he could have agreed with that part, or refuted it. Instead he quoted an english poet to show how I could be 'intolerant' !! He uses the same formula, this time south is tolerant !! I think he uses that word quite efficiently.

KapiDhwaja said...

A humorous read aboutIndia's Image Management by B.S. Prakash, the Indian Consul General at San Francisco...

KapiDhwaja said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
KapiDhwaja said...

As always, another great article by T.V.R Shenoy, on Muslim Separatism. I agree with the contention that if in Saudi Arabia all women whether Muslim or Non-Muslim, and Arab or White or Brown etc. have to cover themselves from head to toe, than it follows that Muslim women should not be allowed to wear the Burkha or other head-gear in Non-Muslim countries.

KapiDhwaja said...

I just love this brave Swami, Baba Ramdev. Now he is going after the "Father of the Nation" and rubbing the Kangress the wrong way. What Baba Ramdev says is true and it really hurts the Kangressis. More power to him...
Now the secular hyenas of the Left and the Kangress will be baying for his blood. Hope he doesn't cow down before them.

Ramdev's talk on Gandhi sparks row
ANI
Posted Wednesday, November 29, 2006 at 18:16

TROUBLE CALL: Ramdev said Gandhi's non-violence alone did not achieve freedom for the country.

Jabalpur/Indore: Self-styled yoga guru Baba Ramdev has courted the wrath of followers of the father of the nation, Mahamta Gandhi, for his comment that Gandhi's non-violence alone did not achieve freedom for the country.
Ramdev, hugely popular for propagating the healing of diseases through yoga, said the country should not ignore the contributions of revolutionaries in its fight against British colonial rule.

He said this in Jabalpur, where he is imparting yoga training to Army personnel.

"See, I am a follower of penance, sacrifice, non-violence and truth. But I am also a follower of revolutionaries. I live a simple life. I don't do what everyone else does. But I believe that the freedom of our country is because of the sacrifice of martyrs," Baba Ramdev said.

"If somebody says that the country achieved independence without arms, without bloodshed, I believe that is an insult to the country's martyrs," he added.

Gandhi's followers, mainly activists of the Congress Party, were quick to retort.

They charged Ramdev with insulting the Father of the Nation. Youth workers of the Congress burnt posters of Ramdev and shouted slogans against him.

Angry protestors urged Baba Ramdev to concentrate on Yoga only.
"We believe what he (Ramdev) said is not correct. He should just concentrate on yoga only," said Devendre Singh Yadav, a leader of the Youth Congress in Indore.

habc said...

behold the religion of peace
http://www.thesun.co.uk/article/0,,2-2006510243,00.html

http://www.thesun.co.uk/article/0,,2-2006510113,00.html

virat0 said...

There is a book on worshipping false gods. This book talks on Ambedkar, and his employement with british govt and the activities during that period.

Now he has statues and all that....
http://www.rediff.com/news/2006/nov/30statue.htm

The people who organize it want to confuse, in return they have goondaism from stalinist revolutions and such stuff....caste is not only aryan dravidian race, but also marxist class. Somehow the goondaism must rule !


One of their major purpose is to convince sane people that insane is sane, violence is non violence, ambedkar and his work with british are godly.... if these stalinsts pretend to be non-violenet, sane, godly then it is just to confuse. One passive way to defeat them is not to succumb to their pretention.

virat0 said...

Looks like these guys created quite a lot of nuisance.

http://www.rediff.com/news/2006/nov/30reader.htm

One message mentions that people didn't read ambedkar. Ambedkar was working with the british untill independence and creating all sorts of nuisance against the congress of Mahatma Gandhi. Now Ambedkar is made into a decent person who aught to be followed!

KapiDhwaja said...

The Yanks are being a little candid about their special relationship with United Queendom. Basically they acknowledge that Britain is a country subordinate to the US.

Such is the fate of countries who want to have a special relationship with the sole superpower. The below article shows that...

Tony Blair’s government today launched a concerted effort to discredit a senior US official who has dismissed the special relationship as “a myth”.

Both Number 10 and the Foreign Office set out to belittle Kendall Myers, a senior State Department analyst, for claiming the relationship between Britain and the US was “totally one-sided”.

advertisementMr Blair has shown President George W Bush staunch support over the invasion of Iraq.

But in a lecture in Washington, Mr Myers indicated that despite all that, “we typically ignore them and take no notice – it’s a sad business”.

He also suggested that Mr Blair should have been ditched by Labour but the party had lacked the "courage or audacity" to remove him.

But David Cameron, the Conservative leader, was "shrewd, astute" to have distanced himself from America, Mr Myers argued.

Kim Howells, the Foreign Office Minister, led the counter-attack by portraying Mr Myers as a “discredited individual” offering “discredited policies”.

Mr Howells told Sky News: "I don't know if Kendall Myers is trying to sell a book or not.

“These individuals in Washington have got a great sense of self-importance, they try to lay off this impression that they have got the ear of the president, that they've got this great role.”

He insisted that Mr Myers was “just another individual and there are plenty of discredited individuals that have come out with discredited policies in Washington before now and I'm sure there will be many in the future."

Asked about Mr Howells’s comment, the Prime Minister’s official spokesman said: “If I was described in those terms, I would be looking for a different job.”

The spokesman also insisted that Mr Myers was an academic who was “not representative of the State Department”.

The State Department itself sought to repair the damage, saying: "The views expressed by Mr Myers in no way represent the views of the United States government."

Mr Myers’s remarks are deeply embarrassing for Mr Blair who has stood shoulder-to-shoulder with Mr Bush over the invasion of Iraq and an increasingly difficult aftermath.

Mr Cameron’s Conservatives, who under former leader Michael Howard supported the war, declined to comment on the row today.

But Liberal Democrat leader Menzies Campbell siezed on the remarks.

“For the special relationship to be effective it is necessary that Britain should be candid, independently minded and assertive," he said.

“The background to military action in Iraq demonstrated in leaked minutes and contemporary accounts is that Great Britain was not assertive enough and that the Prime Minister placed too much store on the hope of influencing President Bush in private by being uncritically supportive in public.

“The relationship needs to be rebalanced, neither Britain nor America have benefited from the Bush and Blair axis.”

Mr Myers asserted that the "special relationship", a term coined by Sir Winston Churchill in 1946, gave Britain little or nothing.

"It has been, from the very beginning, very one-sided. There never really has been a special relationship, or at least not one we've noticed," he added.

The result of the Iraq war would be that any future British prime minister would be much less cosy with Washington than Mr Blair had been, and that Mr Blair’s much vaunted view that Britain was "a transatlantic bridge" was now redundant.

Mr Myers said Donald Rumsfeld's comment before the invasion of Iraq in March 2003 that America could go it alone without Britain had been a clarifying moment.

"That was the giveaway. I felt a little ashamed and a certain sadness that we had treated him [Mr Blair] like that. And yet, here it was, there was nothing – no payback, no sense of a reciprocity of the relationship."

During the Vietnam War, Harold Wilson had been "a great deal more clever than Tony Blair".

Mr Wilson "managed to fool us on Vietnam" and "succeeded by sounding good but doing nothing".

Mr Blair had done the opposite.

"Blair got it the other way round and joined in this Iraq adventure." Mr Myers conceded that the Prime Minister had faced a difficult decision in 2003. "The way that Iraq developed, it would have been extremely difficult for Tony Blair to have done a Harold Wilson."

The Bush administration took little account of what Britain said, Mr Myers claimed.

"We typically ignore them and take no notice. We say, 'There are the Brits coming to tell us how to run our empire. Let's park them'. It is a sad business and I don't think it does them justice."

While he conceded that Mr Blair was more articulate than Mr Bush, the Prime Minister's ignorance of the British experience in Mesopotamia had led him to make a catastrophic error in backing the Iraq invasion.

"Unfortunately, Tony Blair's background was as an actor and not an historian. If only he'd read a book on the 1920s he might have hesitated."

Iraq became a nation state in 1920 after being carved out by the French and British from the remains of the Ottoman empire. It turned out to be a bloody affair that Churchill referred to as the "Mesopotamian entanglement".

In the Middle East, America had "not only failed to do what we wanted in Iraq but we have greatly strained our relationships with others".

Iraq was the single issue that now dominated transatlantic affairs, but Mr Blair had been unable to get anything in return from Mr Bush.

"I can't think of anything he got on the asset side of the ledger."

Mr Myers, a senior analyst with the State Department's Bureau of Analysis and Research, was speaking in a lecture in Washington at the School of Advanced International Studies, part of Johns Hopkins University.

The public lecture was entitled: "How special is the United States-United Kingdom relationship after Iraq?"

Mr Myers said Mr Blair's reputation was in tatters over Iraq. "One of the most brilliant prime ministerships of modern times was brought a cropper by the Iraq war."

Mr Cameron had been cunning to say in September that Britain must be "not slavish in how we approach the special relationship".

KapiDhwaja said...

This is a little late news story, but a significant one nevertheless. Last week India successfully tested its own ABM(Anti-Ballistic Missile) system by knocking out an in-coming ballistic missile with an interceptor missile in Orissa. This test really changes the entire strategic environment around us and puts us among the Big Boys. Only US, Russia and Israel have an ABM program. No other European country or China or the Pakis have it. The test really caught strategists all over the world by surprise.

If we can further develop and deploy the complete system, we can take care of almost all of Pakis' missiles and most of the Chinese ones. Gives us a huge advantage when we have to wage war with them.

Below is an article by noted military analysts Raj Chengappa...


The New Guardian

India unveils an all new anti-ballistic missile expected to be the fore-runner of a sophisticated air defence system to thwart, among other threats, a Pakistani nuclear weapons attack



By Raj Chengappa


PICTURE SPEAK


MYSTERY MISSILE: The interceptor lifting off from Orissa


It looks like the Prithvi and even flies like one, but that's where the semblance ends. On November 27, not just India but the world got to know the difference after the Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) unveiled a brand new missile, said to be a precursor to an advanced national air defence system.
The test was short but decisive. At 10.15 on a blustery winter morning off the east coast of Orissa, a conventional Prithvi missile posing as an enemy weapon was launched. Within seconds after its take-off, a sophisticated, long-range radar picked up the signals, analysed its flight path and sent an electronic command to an interceptor missile stationed at Wheeler Island. Almost immediately, the interceptor codenamed pad01 lifted off with a roar and plume of smoke. Travelling at five times the speed of sound, it rapidly closed in on the incoming Prithvi. Two minutes later and after some mid-course corrections, pad01 detonated its proximity fuse at a height of 50 km above the Earth. Both the missiles exploded in a ball of gas and the debris fell harmlessly into the Bay of Bengal.

Given its height-known in scientific parlance as exoatmospheric, or outside the Earth's atmosphere-there was no way scientists could either see or even hear the bang. Instead, they sat huddled inside the mission control room watching the entire sequence on a radar.

Almost out of a James Bond flick, the two blips on the screen closed in on each other rapidly and on touching, exploded in a shower of dots. Soon after the launch, DRDO's chief controller for missiles and the programme director for air defence systems, Dr V.K. Saraswat, told INDIA TODAY: "This test signals India's entry into the area of sophisticated and complex missile defence technology."

Several major quantum leaps in technology had to be achieved by India to do it. Anti-ballistic missile (ABM) systems require highly accurate radars capable of tracking incoming warheads from a greater distance. Before pad01 was developed, India had a radar detection capability of 100 km. For the air defence system, DRDO claims to have "jointly developed" a radar capable of tracking high-speed missiles at a distance of over 1,000 km. They are not as yet willing to reveal identities of the key agencies that collaborated with them for its development.

The interceptor missile, too, had to be designed and built from scratch. Its first stage is similar to that of the Prithvi and uses its liquid fuel engine. But for the second-stage 'kill vehicle', a powerful solid motor was developed apart from divert thrusters that gives it a high degree of manoeuvrability. It makes the missile a metre longer than the nine-m Prithvi. The interceptor is also equipped with terminal homing guidance system with an RF (radar frequency) seeker to detect targets at long range of low radar cross-section and travelling at high speeds. As important was the development of a communications network by Bharat Electronics to integrate the radars and the interceptors with the mission control centre.

The test did catch strategic experts by surprise. That's because the country's newest air defence system is being developed under a thick cloak of secrecy with the programme remaining unlisted. Saraswat, who was the Prithvi mission director, was given full charge of the project five years ago. The applause, though, has been muted. As retired Air Vice-Marshal Kapil Kak, joint director, Centre for Air Power Studies, said: "There is no doubt that this is an achievement if India has developed some kind of interceptor missile system. But we are also a long way to establishing a minimal anti-ballistic missile capability. What has been done is a proof of concept."

ABMs systems, like the one India tested, have been a subject of raging controversy among strategic circles. These were developed to destroy incoming ballistic missiles carrying both nuclear and conventional warheads primarily because till then there was no counter to them. Initially, only the US and the erstwhile Soviet Union invested in such counters. But given its prohibitive costs and also its propensity to intensify the arms race, both nations entered a treaty in 1972 severely limiting their capability to develop such missiles.

It was only after the Cold War, when Washington saw with growing concern a number of nations, including North Korea and Iran, developing missile capabilities, that it decided to build a national missile defence system. Now the US plans to build an array of radars capable of accurately tracking missile launches at long ranges and then launching interceptor missiles to kill them long before they touch target. Yet in the US, a great deal of scepticism is voiced by experts who question whether such a missile shield would truely be effective or worth the enormous costs involved.

For India to move down the road and develop a defence shield of some credibility and reliability to thwart Pakistani missiles among others, it would have to invest in over a dozen long-range radars capable of tracking a range of weapon systems. These would help detect any incoming missile from major threat zones. It would then have to develop and test a whole battery of interceptors that would be an effective counter to such threats. Also, with other nations constantly developing counters to ABMs, including equipping missiles with multiple warheads to confuse interceptors, perfecting such systems is a constant technological struggle. As Saraswat put it: "We should be able to handle anything that is thrown at us."

The costs could be steep. To the credit of Indian scientists though, they have dared to explore the frontiers of missile technology. With last week's test, India has become the youngest member of a select band of nations-the US, Russia and Israel-who have the capability of developing missile defence systems.

bodhi dharma said...

Where is Rajeev, the blog is not getting updated?

sand_dunes said...

hey as usual the gr8 times of india have rubbished this missle test saying how Duds the men at drdo are and what waste of money they are on the national exchequeor ..

KapiDhwaja said...

Yup, we all know where the loyalties of the English Language Media in India are, and which countries pay them to spread disinfomation.