Thursday, December 17, 2015

Fwd: The Abrahamic God

must read, as always, by michel.

yeah, ialdoboath the blind demiurge attempting to usurp the role of his dad.

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From:

http://indiafacts.org/the-abrahamic-god/?singlepage=1
 17-12-2015
An excerpt from Michel Danino's book "Indian Culture and India's Future". Our first task therefore  is to examine the Abrahamic concept of God at the root of the three monotheistic religions: Yahweh (later Jehovah) or Allah. I do not refer here to more ancient Greek, Norse or Celtic gods since, as we know, they lost the war against God with a capital "G". (Some of them are now striving to revive, but even if they partly succeed, they will be little more than pale replicas of their original selves.)

The first thing that strikes the discerning Indian reader of the Old Testament, especially the Exodus, in which Jehovah first introduces himself to Moses under that name, is his ungodlike character. Jehovah is admittedly jealous: the second of the Ten Commandments reads, "You shall have no other gods before me," while the third explicitly forbids the making and worship of any idols, "for I am a jealous God, punishing the children for the sin of the fathers". Jehovah does speak as often of punishment as he does of sin, and periodically goes into a state of 'fierce anger', promising the most complete devastation of the Hebrews who reject him. Not content with cursing his reluctant followers, he also curses nation after nation, and finally the earth itself, which, as I pointed out earlier, he holds responsible for man's sins: "The day of the Lord is coming – a cruel day, with wrath and fierce anger – to make the land desolate and destroy the sinners within it". (Isaiah, 13:9). In fact, he is so obsessed with sin that one looks in vain in his oppressive berating and legislating for any hint of a higher spirituality, such as we find in the Upanishads or the Gita. Contrast his jealousy with Krshna's insistence on spiritual freedom: "Whatever form of me any devotee with faith desires to worship, I make that faith of his firm and undeviating' (Gita, 7.21), or again: "Others… worship me in my oneness and in every separate being and in all my million universal faces" (9:15). But the god of the Bible and the Koran will have none of this catholicity.

If Jehovah had stopped there we might have found him to be simply a foul-tempered and libidinous god; after all, some Puranic gods too have such defects, although they usually retain a sense of their limits and compassion of which Jehovah is spotlessly guiltless. But he has a plan, he means business and knows that coercion alone can establish his rule: when the Hebrews over whom he is so keen to hold sway go back to their former worship of a 'golden calf', he orders through Moses that each of the faithful should "kill his brother and friend and neighbor" (Exodus 32:37). Instructions which were promptly complied with, for we are informed that 3,000 were killed on that fateful day; to crown his punishment, Jehovah "struck the people with a plague."

I find it highly symbolic that Judaism should have been born in blood and fear, not out of love for its founding deity. As Sri Aurobindo put it, "The Jew invented the God-fearing man; India the God-knower and God-lover." It probably took centuries for the old cults to disappear altogether, and a stream of prophets who sought to strike terror into the hearts of the Israelites. It was a radical, unprecedented departure from the ancient world cultures. Naturally, it did not stop there and went ontu find more fertile soils in Christianity and Islam: earlier, Jehovah was content with being the god of the Hebrews alone; now, reborn in the new creeds, his ambition extended to the whole earth.

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