Monday, November 12, 2012

Article: Hindu Festival Page - #Diwali

For Newspapers

Download PDF: Single-Page, Full-Color Broadsheet

For Magazines

Download PDF: Two-Page, Full-Color Magazine Spread

http://www.hinduismtoday.com/modules/wfchannel/index.php?wfc_cid=46

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on galaxy note, pardon brevity

3 comments:

witan said...

I took a quick look at the article (pdf file) and I am disappointed. May mention the following:

Effigies of Ravan are NOT burnt during Diwali or Deepavali.
In the South, Deepavali (as it is called there) is celebrated as the victory of Krishna Bhagavan (or rather his consort, Satyabhama) over the daemon, Narakasura. The daemon was killed early in the morning, before sunrise. That is why Deepavali is celebrated in the morning in the South unlike Diwali in the North, which is celebrated in the evening.
It is sad that a Hindu organization in US should make ignorant statements about Diwali and Deepavali.

witan said...

It is sad that a Hindu organization in US should be making ignorant statements about Diwali and Deepavali.
May I point out: (1) that effigies of Ravana are NOT burnt during Diwali or Deepavali ceebrations; and (2) Deepavali in the South is in celebration of the defeat and killing of the daemon Narakasura by Krishna Bhagavan (or rather by his consort Sathyabhama). The daemon was killed early in the morning before sunrise, and, accordingly, Deepavali celebrations start in the early morning, unlike Diwali, which is celebrated in the evening.

nizhal yoddha said...

give them a break, witan, don't be overly critical. the hinduism today folks, working out of hawaii, are doing a great job, so let's not be overly critical.

also, when you say 'South' i think you mean 'Tamil Nadu'. in kerala, deepavali is hardly celebrated. and anyway, there is a pan-indian melding of legends and ideas; so for instance, after ravi varma, the sari became the national dress (alas, after nehru, the horrible salwar-kameez is now the national dress). ganesh chaturthi traveled from maharashtra to the rest of india. so let the pan-indian manifestations of ideas move forward, without local traditions being trampled.